Based on your enjoyment of Cutting for Stone” by Abraham Verghese… You're likely* to like:

* statistically, based on millions of data-points provided by fellow humans

  1. Little Bee

    by Chris Cleave
    Quality: 🟢🟢🟡⚪️
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    Readership: Fairly popular

    Using alternating first-person perspectives , the novel tells the stories of Little Bee, a Nigerian refugee, and Sarah O'Rourke (née Summers), a magazine editor from Surrey . After spending two years detained in a British immigration detention centre , Little Bee is illegally released after a fellow refugee performs sexual favours for a detention officer. She travels to the home of Sarah and her husband Andrew, whom she met two years previously on a beach in the Niger Delta . Sarah is initially unaware of Little Bee's presence, until Andrew, haunted by guilt of their shared past, commits suicide. Little … (Wikipedia)

  2. State of Wonder

    by Ann Patchett
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    Readership: Somewhat known

    In a narrative replete with poison arrows, devouring snakes, scientific miracles, and spiritual transformations, "State of Wonder" presents a world of stunning surprise and danger, rich in emotional resonance and moral complexity. As Dr. Marina Singh embarks upon an uncertain odyssey into the insect-infested Amazon, she will be forced to surrender herself to the lush but forbidding world that awaits within the jungle. Charged with finding her former mentor Dr. Annick Swenson, a researcher who has disappeared while working on a valuable new drug, she will have to confront her own memories of tragedy and sacrifice as she journeys into … (Goodreads)

  3. The Invention of Wings

    by Sue Monk Kidd
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    Readership: Fairly popular

    Writing at the height of her narrative and imaginative gifts, Sue Monk Kidd presents a masterpiece of hope, daring, the quest for freedom, and the desire to have a voice in the world—and it is now the newest Oprah’s Book Club 2.0 selection. Hetty “Handful” Grimke, an urban slave in early nineteenth century Charleston, yearns for life beyond the suffocating walls that enclose her within the wealthy Grimke household. The Grimke’s daughter, Sarah, has known from an early age she is meant to do something large in the world, but she is hemmed in by the limits imposed on women. … (Goodreads)

  4. And the Mountains Echoed

    by Khaled Hosseini
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    Readership: Fairly popular

    The novel opens in the year 1952. Saboor, an impoverished farmer from the fictional village of Shadbagh, decides to sell his three-year-old daughter Pari to a wealthy, childless couple in Kabul. Abdullah adores Pari, and helps collect various feathers for her which she loves. Once, he sold a pair of his shoes for a peacock feather because he know Pari would treasure it. Ignorant of his father's plans, 10 year old Abdullah, who has raised Pari since their mother died giving birth to her, insists on following when his father departs from the village to Kabul with Pari. After slapping … (Wikipedia)

  5. Sarah's Key

    by Tatiana de Rosnay
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    Readership: Popular

    From beloved international sensation and #1 ,New York Times, bestselling author Tatiana de Rosnay come's her most celebrated novel ,Sarah's Key,—now in mass market paperback!,, Paris, July 1942: Sarah, a ten year-old girl, is brutally arrested with her family by the French police in the Vel' d'Hiv' roundup, but not before she locks her younger brother in a cupboard in the family's apartment, thinking that she will be back within a few hours. Paris, May 2002: On Vel' d'Hiv's 60th anniversary, journalist Julia Jarmond is asked to write an article about this black day in France's past. Through her contemporary … (Barnes & Noble)

  6. Bel Canto

    by Ann Patchett
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    Readership: Fairly popular

    Set in an unspecified South American country, ,, the story begins at a birthday party thrown at the country's vice presidential home in honor of Katsumi Hosokawa, the visiting chairman of a large Japanese company and opera enthusiast. As a not-so-subtle pretext to get Hosokawa to invest in the country, famous American soprano Roxane Coss is scheduled to perform as the highlight of the party. Near the end of the party, members of a terrorist organization break into the house, intending to take the President of the country hostage. When they realize the President is not in attendance, the terrorist … (Wikipedia)

  7. The Art of Racing in the Rain

    by Garth Stein
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    Readership: Popular

    Enzo knows he is different from other dogs: a philosopher with a nearly human soul (and an obsession with opposable thumbs), he has educated himself by watching television extensively, and by listening very closely to the words of his master, Denny Swift, an up-and-coming race car driver. Through Denny, Enzo has gained tremendous insight into the human condition, and he sees that life, like racing, isn't simply about going fast. On the eve of his death, Enzo takes stock of his life, recalling all that he and his family have been through. A heart-wrenching but deeply funny and ultimately uplifting … (Goodreads)

  8. Orphan Train

    by Christina Baker Kline
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    Readership: Popular

    The #1 New York Times Bestseller “A lovely novel about the search for family that also happens to illuminate a fascinating and forgotten chapter of America’s history. Beautiful.”—Ann Packer Moving between contemporary Maine and Depression-era Minnesota, ,Orphan Train, is a powerful novel of upheaval and resilience, of second chances, and unexpected friendship. Between 1854 and 1929, so-called orphan trains ran regularly from the cities of the East Coast to the farmlands of the Midwest, carrying thousands of abandoned children whose fates would be determined by pure luck. Would they be adopted by a kind and loving family, or would they … (Barnes & Noble)

  9. People of the Book

    by Geraldine Brooks
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    Readership: Somewhat known

    The "complex and moving" ( The New Yorker ) novel by Pulitzer Prize winner Geraldine Brooks follows a rare manuscript through centuries of exile and war. Inspired by a true story, "People of the Book" is a novel of sweeping historical grandeur and intimate emotional intensity by an acclaimed and beloved author. Called "a tour de force" by the San Francisco Chronicle , this ambitious, electrifying work traces the harrowing journey of the famed Sarajevo Haggadah, a beautifully illuminated Hebrew manuscript created in fifteenth-century Spain. When it falls to Australian rare book expert Hanna Heath to conserve this priceless work, … (Goodreads)

  10. Peace Like a River

    by Leif Enger
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    Readership: Eclectic

    Once in a great while, we encounter a novel in our voluminous reading that begs to be read aloud. Leif Enger's debut, Peace Like a River , is one such work. His richly evocative novel, narrated by an asthmatic 11-year-old named Reuben Land, is the story of Reuben's unusual family and their journey across the frozen Badlands of the Dakotas in search of his fugitive older brother. Charged with the murder of two locals who terrorized their family, Davy has fled, understanding that the scales of justice will not weigh in his favor. But Reuben, his father, Jeremiah—a man of … (Goodreads)

  11. Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet

    by Jamie Ford
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    Readership: Fairly popular

    Henry Lee, the son of Chinese parents in Seattle , Washington, is the only Asian child at his elementary school. His father makes him wear an "I Am Chinese" button so he will not be mistaken for a Japanese boy in the heightened racist climate of World War II Seattle. But Henry is nevertheless bullied by his white classmates and must work long hours in the cafeteria dishing out meals and cleaning up to fulfill the terms of his scholarship. One day a Japanese-American girl named Keiko Okabe joins him, also on scholarship. Henry and Keiko bond. When the residents … (Wikipedia)

  12. The Story of Edgar Sawtelle

    by David Wroblewski
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    Readership: Eclectic

    Forte's Children Edgar comes from a line of dog breeders. After buying a farm, his grandfather, John Sawtelle, rents out the farmland and starts dog breeding . He and his wife have two sons, Edgar's father (Gar) and Claude. Claude leaves the farm and Gar stays on and carries on the family business. After some troubled attempts to have a child, Gar and his wife (Trudy) have Edgar. After his parents come to understand that he is mute his parents learn sign language along with him, some made up and some real signs. Edgar grows up on the farm learning … (Wikipedia)

  13. East of Eden

    by John Steinbeck
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    Readership: Popular

    In his journal, Nobel Prize winner John Steinbeck called East of Eden “the first book,” and indeed it has the primordial power and simplicity of myth. Set in the rich farmland of California’s Salinas Valley, this sprawling and often brutal novel follows the intertwined destinies of two families—the Trasks and the Hamiltons—whose generations helplessly reenact the fall of Adam and Eve and the poisonous rivalry of Cain and Abel. Adam Trask came to California from the East to farm and raise his family on the new rich land. But the birth of his twins, Cal and Aaron, brings his wife … (Goodreads)

  14. Angle of Repose

    by Wallace Stegner
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    Readership: Eclectic

    Lyman Ward narrates a century after the fact. Lyman interprets the story at times and leaves gaps that he points out at other times. Some of the disappointments of his life, including his divorce, color his interpretation of his grandparents' story. Toward the end of the novel, he gives up on his original ambition of writing a complete biography of his grandmother. Stegner's use of Mary Hallock Foote 's historical letters gives the novel's locations— Grass Valley , Leadville , New Almaden , Idaho , and Mexico—an authentic feel; the letters also add vividness to the Wards' struggles with the … (Wikipedia)

  15. Before We Were Yours

    by Lisa Wingate
    Quality: 🟢🟢🟡⚪️
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    Readership: Popular

    Memphis, 1939. Twelve-year-old Rill Foss and her four younger siblings live a magical life aboard their family’s Mississippi River shantyboat. But when their father must rush their mother to the hospital one stormy night, Rill is left in charge—until strangers arrive in force. Wrenched from all that is familiar and thrown into a Tennessee Children’s Home Society orphanage, the Foss children are assured that they will soon be returned to their parents—but they quickly realize the dark truth. At the mercy of the facility’s cruel director, Rill fights to keep her sisters and brother together in a world of danger … (Goodreads)

  16. Prodigal Summer

    by Barbara Kingsolver
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    Readership: Eclectic

    Prodigal Summer tells the story of a small town in Appalachia during a single, humid summer, when three interweaving stories of love, loss and family unfold against the backdrop of the lush wildness of Virginia mountains. The narrative follows Deanna, a solitary woman working as a park ranger, Lusa, a recently widowed entomologist at odds with her late farmer husband's tight-knit family, and Garnett, an old man who dreams of restoring the lineage of the extinct American Chestnut tree. Kingsolver's extensive education in biology is on display in this book, laden with ecological concepts and biological facts. Her writing also … (Wikipedia)

  17. Americanah

    by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
    Quality: 🟢🟢🟢🟢
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    Readership: Fairly popular

    Ifemelu and Obinze are young and in love when they depart military-ruled Nigeria for the West. Beautiful, self-assured Ifemelu heads for America, where despite her academic success, she is forced to grapple with what it means to be black for the first time. Quiet, thoughtful Obinze had hoped to join her, but with post-9/11 America closed to him, he instead plunges into a dangerous, undocumented life in London. Fifteen years later, they reunite in a newly democratic Nigeria, and reignite their passion—for each other and for their homeland. … (Goodreads)

  18. The Paris Wife

    by Paula McLain
    Quality: 🟢🟢🟡⚪️
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    Readership: Fairly popular

    The Paris Wife focuses on the romance, marriage and divorce of Ernest Hemingway and his first wife Hadley Richardson, who met when Hemingway was 20 years old, and Richardson 28. They marry and move to Paris soon afterwards, where Hemingway befriends Ezra Pound , F. Scott Fitzgerald , Gertrude Stein , and James Joyce . Hadley sees the open marriages/relationships of her husband's friends, and suspects he is having an affair with Duff Twysden until his book The Sun Also Rises appears and then Hadley realises that their special relationship is because Duff is the spark that ignited Hemingway's first … (Wikipedia)

  19. The Language of Flowers

    by Vanessa Diffenbaugh
    Quality: 🟢🟢🟡⚪️
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    Readership: Somewhat known

    The Victorian language of flowers was used to convey romantic expressions: honeysuckle for devotion, asters for patience, and red roses for love. But for Victoria Jones, it’s been more useful in communicating mistrust and solitude. After a childhood spent in the foster-care system, she is unable to get close to anybody, and her only connection to the world is through flowers and their meanings. Now eighteen and emancipated from the system with nowhere to go, Victoria realizes she has a gift for helping others through the flowers she chooses for them. But an unexpected encounter with a mysterious stranger has … (Goodreads)

  20. The Lincoln Highway

    by Amor Towles
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    Readership: Somewhat known

    The bestselling author of A Gentleman in Moscow and Rules of Civility and master of absorbing, sophisticated fiction returns with a stylish and propulsive novel set in 1950s America In June, 1954, eighteen-year-old Emmett Watson is driven home to Nebraska by the warden of the work farm where he has just served a year for involuntary manslaughter. His mother long gone, his father recently deceased, and the family farm foreclosed upon by the bank, Emmett’s intention is to pick up his eight-year-old brother and head west where they can start their lives anew. But when the warden drives away, Emmett … (Goodreads)